For the consecutive fourth legislative session, the Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) has joined with legislators, law enforcement, judges, family violence service advocates, domestic violence survivors and other Texans to send a message of support for full funding for family violence services.  Family violence advocates gathered on March 14, 2011, to deliver purple postcards to the 82nd Texas Legislature.

Leading the show of support this year were Senator Jane Nelson and Representative Elliot Naishtat who both signed purple postcards. In addition to Sen. Nelson and Rep. Naishtat, TCFV Board President Marta B. Peláez and domestic violence survivor Renee Johnson took part in the press conference.  Ms. Johnson told her story of fleeing her home  and several shelters across Texas to escape her abusive husband. “If it wasn’t for domestic violence shelters in Texas, I would not be in my apartment today and I would probably be dead,” said Johnson.

Senator Nelson stated “Despite great strides in our state and communities, the voices of family violence victims are still too often silenced. Each of these purple postcards gives voice to those survivors, sending a powerful message to the Legislature that domestic violence services must be a priority.”

In 2009, nearly 80,000 women, children and men found safe sanctuary from violence at domestic violence shelters and at least 111 women died in Texas in domestic violence deaths.  It is imperative that we fund the family violence services that will help prevent and eliminate this serious crime.

Over the past several months, TCFV collected thousands of purple postcards from state domestic violence programs, survivors of domestic violence and voters.  The postcards are being delivered to legislators in the Texas Senate and House of Representatives to show how important full funding is for family violence programs.  Advocates, allies and survivors of family violence use the color purple to symbolize their work to end violence within families.

Thank you to everyone who signed a purple postcard, whether on paper or online, as this will send a strong message of support to legislators for full funding for family violence services in Texas.

For the consecutive fourth legislative session, the Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) has joined with legislators, law enforcement, judges, family violence service advocates, domestic violence survivors and other Texans to send a message of support for full funding for family violence services.  Family violence advocates gathered on March 14, 2011, to deliver purple postcards to the 82nd Texas Legislature.

Leading the show of support this year were Senator Jane Nelson and Representative Elliot Naishtat who both signed purple postcards. In addition to Sen. Nelson and Rep. Naishtat, TCFV Board President Marta B. Peláez and domestic violence survivor Renee Johnson took part in the press conference.  Ms. Johnson told her story of fleeing her home  and several shelters across Texas to escape her abusive husband. “If it wasn’t for domestic violence shelters in Texas, I would not be in my apartment today and I would probably be dead,” said Johnson.

Senator Nelson stated “Despite great strides in our state and communities, the voices of family violence victims are still too often silenced. Each of these purple postcards gives voice to those survivors, sending a powerful message to the Legislature that domestic violence services must be a priority.”

In 2009, nearly 80,000 women, children and men found safe sanctuary from violence at domestic violence shelters and at least 111 women died in Texas in domestic violence deaths.  It is imperative that we fund the family violence services that will help prevent and eliminate this serious crime.

Over the past several months, TCFV collected thousands of purple postcards from state domestic violence programs, survivors of domestic violence and voters.  The postcards are being delivered to legislators in the Texas Senate and House of Representatives to show how important full funding is for family violence programs.  Advocates, allies and survivors of family violence use the color purple to symbolize their work to end violence within families.

Thank you to everyone who signed a purple postcard, whether on paper or online, as this will send a strong message of support to legislators for full funding for family violence services in Texas.