Archive for October, 2013

Published by mcontreras on 21 Oct 2013

Development Director – Noah Project

Noah Project is in search of a new Development Director.

Development Director – responsible for the identification, cultivation, solicitation and stewardship of donors. Minimum of Bachelor’s in related field and 5 years’ experience; demonstrated track record of successful fundraising in a non-profit environment. Email resumes to: noahproj@camalott.com.

 

DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

 

General Description:  The Development Director (DD) is responsible for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship of donors. The DD will foster a culture of philanthropy within the organization in order to secure sufficient funds and resources to meet the budget and grant-matching requirements of the ongoing and long term goals of agency operations. The DD will maintain appropriate systems to fund development including, but not limited to, donor management, endowment, research and cultivation, and gift processing and recognition. He/she will also be responsible for maintaining accountability and compliance standards for donors and funding sources.  The DD is supervised by the Executive Director, and works closely with the Administrative Director and Development Committee of the Board of Directors.

 

Supervision:  The DD is supervised by and reports directly to the Executive Director.

 

Classification:  Exempt

 

Essential Job Functions:

  1. Meet with the Executive Director on a regular basis to determine project priorities and strategize funding approaches and cultivation plans.
  2. Participate with the Executive Director, Board of Directors and staff in charting the organization’s course in fund development.
  3. Stay informed on philanthropy and fund development and ensure such activities are carried out in keeping with the organization’s values, mission, vision and plans, and can compassionately articulate the Noah Project story.
  4. Help develop a balanced funding mix of donor sources and solicitation programs tailored to the needs of organization that will enable it to attract, retain, and motivate donors and fundraising volunteers. (This may include, but is not limited to, establishing planned giving, increasing ongoing donor base, developing an endowment fund, extending donor base beyond Abilene, etc.).
  5. Develop a caseload of active major gifts prospects, and carry out strategies for solicitation of these prospects.
  6. Prepare and provide accurate and timely activity reports and revenue forecast.
  7. Develop, maintain, and/or monitor a donor base sufficient to meet the funds and resource requirements of the organization’s operations, including coordinating all fund-raising activities that relate to the donor base/ data base.
  8. Assist with the research for and completion of grant applications for organization operations. Coordinate with the Executive Director and Staff in developing and/or writing grant proposals.
  9. Develop all materials to support and track fund-raising activities including all, invitations, brochures, event print and correspondence.
  10. Respond to all gifts received by the organization.
  11. Coordinate all public relations endeavors including speaking engagements, media presentations and mail outs (brochures, newsletters, etc.).
  12. Maintain a good professional relationship with the community and statewide organizations that have an interest in or provide support to Noah Project.
  13. Prepare and distribute quarterly newsletter.
  14. Participate in ongoing development education, seminars, and workshops.
  15. Other duties as assigned by Executive Director.  

 

Minimum Qualifications:

  1. Graduation from an accredited four-year college or university with a major course of study in development, public relations, communication, or a related field.
  2. 5+ years of front-line experience in leadership gifts development.
  3. Demonstrated track record of successful fundraising in an environment of similar complexity.
  4. Ability to engage the Board of Directors as well as the Executive Director in donor visits.
  5. Successful experience closing complex large commitments including planned gifts, campaign and endowment gifts, and investment options.
  6. Superior presentation skills, including the presence to deal effectively with diverse constituencies including principal donors and Board Members.
  7. Excellent communication skills, including the ability to write and speak clearly and effectively, listen, and an unusual capacity to engage, inspire and persuade.
  8. Some of the aforementioned qualifications may be waived in their entirety with documented evidence of significant success in the areas of grant writing, capital campaign drives, planned giving programs, endowments, and high profile public relations enterprises. 

 

Screenable Job Requirements:

  1. Ability to communicate both in writing and verbally.
  2. Ability to maintain a highly professional appearance in both manner and attire.
  3. Willingness to work a flexible schedule, especially when required for fund-raising and development events or speaking engagements.
  4. Ability to work with a variety of groups, both internal and external to the organization.
  5. Experience in public speaking.  Ability to tactfully participate in media coverage and programs.
  6. Willingness to perform tasks outside of the job description.

 

Selection Procedure:  Applicants for this position will be screened and interviewed in accordance with the Job Posting and Hiring Procedure.

Application Process : Email resumes to: noahproj@camalott.com.

Published by rrios on 14 Oct 2013

Honoring Texas Victims: 114 Women Killed in Texas with Harris County having Highest Number of Domestic Violence Murders in the State

Houston, Texas – October 14, 2013 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today released a new report that shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  114 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.  30 women were killed in Harris County, the highest numbers of domestic violence murders of any county in Texas.  There were 38,490 incidents of domestic violence reported in Harris County and an estimated 65,433 incidents went unreported.

Laura White, a domestic violence survivor, Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson, Rebecca White, CEO at the Houston Area Women’s Center and Rania Mankarious of Crime Stoppers, joined Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in Houston to unveil the annual report titled:  “Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities.”

“Domestic violence hurts families and the community. At the Harris County District Attorney’s Office, our priority is to prosecute these crimes to the fullest extent of the law. Our goal is to increase the safety of victims and their families and hold the batterer accountable,” said Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson.

The report pays tribute to Texas victims by memorializing their story with a brief account of the crime.  It includes core data and statistics culled from our analysis.  “By the Numbers” is a summary, using charts and graphs to depict statistical information pertaining to fatalities, including some demographics.

“Domestic violence murders are knowable, identifiable and predictable,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities recognizes all Texas family violence victims lost in this tragic crime.  We hope the report will evoke deeper and more meaningful discussions about barriers and realities that affect the ability of women to escape danger within their relationships.“

White, who is lucky to have survived her abuse today delivered a personal message of hope and perseverance.  After years of abuse, White was getting a divorce.  Her husband called her and said to come over and he would sign the divorce papers.  But, instead he pulled out a shotgun and shot her a point blank range.  She says her heart froze when he said he was going to kill her and then kill himself.  He said, “If I can’t have you, then no one can.”

She was shot in the stomach in November of 2009 and given a one percent chance of survival.  She endured more than a dozen surgeries and had to recover from the emotional scars of abuse.  “If it wasn’t for domestic violence shelters in Texas, I would not be here today and I would not have been able to heal from the mental scars of abuse,” said White.

The Houston Area Women’s Center, a domestic violence service provider in Houston, helped her with counseling and support.

“While we put the spotlight on domestic violence during October, the Houston Area Women’s Center works year round with individuals and families who have been subjected to violence in their own homes.  Our efforts to provide immediate shelter and long-term advocacy and support are supported by our colleagues in the judicial system and law enforcement.  The support of the Houston community for our work is a critical component of our mission to prevent and reduce domestic violence and sexual assault,” said Rebecca White, President and CEO of the Houston Area Women’s Center.

The report released by the Texas Council on Family Violence and compiled from data from the Texas Department of Public Safety, Texas law enforcement agencies and media reports list names of the victims and gives brief accounts of their deaths.

Some key statistics include:

  • The victim’s ages ranged from age 15 to 84
  • Harris County had the highest number of deaths at 30
  • 74% of the women were killed at home 
  • 60% were shot 
  • 17% were stabbed 
  • 11% were strangled 
  • 21 women had taken steps to leave 
  • 20 homicides within one to two days of a national holiday 
  • 15 bystanders or witnesses killed 
  • 4 bodies burned 

Anyone who is a victim of domestic violence and needs help can call the Houston Area Women’s Center 24 hours a day, seven days a week 713-528-2121.

Published by rrios on 11 Oct 2013

Honoring Texas Victims: 114 Women Killed in Texas

El Paso, Texas – October 11, 2013 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) today released a new report that shows an increase in the number of women killed in domestic violence murders in Texas by their husband, ex-husband, intimate partner, boyfriend or ex-boyfriend.  114 women were killed in domestic violence murders in 2012.  102 women were killed in 2011.  Four women were killed in El Paso County.

El Paso District Attorney Jaime Esparza and Stephanie Karr, Executive Director at the Center Against Family Violence, joined Texas Council on Family Violence CEO Gloria Terry at a news conference in El Paso to unveil the annual report titled:  “Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities.”

The report pays tribute to Texas victims by memorializing their story with a brief account of the crime.  It includes core data and statistics culled from our analysis.  “By the Numbers” is a summary, using charts and graphs to depict statistical information pertaining to fatalities, including some demographics.

“Domestic violence murders are knowable, identifiable and predictable,” said Gloria A. Terry, CEO of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “Honoring Texas Victims: Family Violence Fatalities recognizes all Texas family violence victims lost in this tragic crime.  We hope the report will evoke deeper and more meaningful discussions about barriers and realities that affect the ability of women to escape danger within their relationships. “

The report released by the Texas Council on Family Violence and compiled from data from the Texas Department of Public Safety, Texas law enforcement agencies and media reports list names of the victims and gives brief accounts of their deaths.

Some key statistics include:

  • The victim’s ages ranged from age 15 to 84
  • Harris County had the highest number of deaths
  • 74% of the women were killed at home 
  • 60% were shot 
  • 17% were stabled 
  • 11% were strangled 
  • 21 women had taken steps to leave 
  • 20 homicides within one to two days of a national holiday 
  • 15 bystanders or witnesses killed 
  • 4 bodies burned

“Domestic violence hurts families and it is a crime.  At the District Attorney’s Office we fight to ensure the safety of victims and their families,” said Jaime Esparza, El Paso District Attorney. 

TCFV and the Center against Family Violence also recognized the El Paso District Attorney who received a top national award for protecting victims of domestic violence.  The Foundation for Improvement of Justice, Inc. in Atlanta, selected Esparza as the Paul H. Chapman Award Winner for his efforts to save lives, increase the quality of life for our most vulnerable and have force his peers in the justice system to closely examine their role.

“The Center Against Family Violence (CAFV) is proud of the work of District Attorney Jaime Esparza in advocating for survivors of domestic violence.  He certainly deserves this national recognition for his pioneering work for justice for survivors.  By knowing that the judicial system will be responsive to them, those harmed by domestic violence are more likely to come forward, report this horrible crime and seek help,” said Stephanie Karr, Executive Director at the Center Against Family Violence.

“While we put the spotlight on domestic violence during October, CAFV works year-around with individuals and families who have been subjected to violence in their own homes.  Our efforts to provide immediate shelter and long-term advocacy and support are supported by our colleagues in the judicial system and law enforcement.  The support of the El Paso community for our work is a critical component of our mission to prevent and reduce domestic violence and sexual assault,” said Karr.

Published by rrios on 08 Oct 2013

NNEDV Names TCFV Gloria Terry, CEO to National Board

Austin, Texas – October 8, 2013 – The Texas Council on Family Violence is pleased to announce Gloria Terry, CEO of (TCFV), has been named to the prestigious national board, the National Network to End Domestic Violence, a leading voice for domestic violence victims and their advocates.

The National Network to End Domestic Violence is a membership and advocacy organization of state domestic violence coalitions, allied organizations and supportive individuals.  NNEDV works closely with its members to understand the ongoing and emerging needs of domestic violence victims and advocacy programs. NNEDV makes sure those needs are heard and understood by policymakers at the national level.

“We are honored the CEO of the Texas coalition has joined the NNEDV board.  Gloria brings a wealth of experience to our organization.  She managed a shelter on the Texas- Mexico border, runs one of the largest coalitions in the nation, and is a passionate advocate for victims of domestic violence,” said Kim Gandy, NNEDV President & CEO.

Gloria Aguilera Terry joined the Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) in January 2008 as President.  In 2013, she was promoted to Chief Executive Officer.  In her role as CEO, Gloria guides and directs the statewide activities of TCFV, such as the Texas Legislative Session, establishing and fostering statewide tactical partnerships, working with staff to provide outstanding services to programs and strategically positioning TCFV to create the influence necessary to continue serving the needs of victims and their families.

Ms. Terry came to the Texas Council on Family Violence from El Paso, Texas where she served as Executive Director of the Center against Family Violence (CAFV). During her tenure at the CAFV, Gloria managed a significant border community domestic violence program with a $1.8 million dollar budget and a staff of fifty employees.  Among her major accomplishments as Executive Director of the CAFV, she launched an effective strategy to underscore the agency’s role in the community utilizing a modified version of the Family Justice Center, positioned the Center as Organizing Agency for a $5 million health prevention initiative, strengthened and prioritized education and workforce development initiatives and was successful in obtaining the agency’s first transitional living center.

Before joining the CAFV, Ms. Terry served as Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration, for the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce.  In that capacity she directly managed the daily operations of three corporations and two limited Liability Companies with a varied spectrum of missions from workforce preparedness to affordable housing as well as provided vision, direction and management for all finance and accounting practices for the largest chamber of commerce in the region.

Ms. Terry, a 2003 Leadership Texas graduate, holds a BBA from the University of Texas at El Paso and has extensive community service currently offering time to the Tarrant County Family Advocacy Steering Committee, Collaborative Council for the Judicial Commission for Children, Youth and Families with the Texas Supreme Court, VAWA Planning Committee with the Governor’s Office, National Leadership Committee with Center for Disease Control, Diversity Committee of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and current Board member of the National Network to End Domestic Violence.

The Texas Council on Family Violence has been advocating for victims of domestic violence for 35 years.  As one of the largest domestic violence coalitions in the nation, we lead efforts to end family violence at the statewide level.  Our partners include domestic violence shelters across the state.

Published by rrios on 08 Oct 2013

TCFV Marks October 9th Health Cares About Domestic Violence Day (HCADV Day)

Austin, Texas – October 8, 2013 - The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV), the Verizon Foundation and the Women’s Health and the Family Planning Association of Texas today are for the first time live streaming an important women’s health care event to Texans.  The Health Cares About Domestic Violence Day is a public forum and will provide training from leaders in domestic violence and women’s health care on the health effects of intimate partner violence.

The discussion will explore how health care professionals can assist people they come in contact with who they believe are victims of domestic violence, discussions on partnerships between women’s health providers and domestic violence advocates.  A panel will also discuss the implications of intimate partner violence on teen pregnancy prevention, HIV/AIDS Services, and Maternal/Child Health.

The event is Wednesday October 9th at 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center and will be live streaming at: http://www.livestream.com/tcfv

“Texas has one of the highest rates of uninsured people,” said Gloria A. Terry, President of the Texas Council on Family Violence.  “The Center for Disease Control has identified that intimate partner violence affects health in many ways. Women who have been victimized by an intimate partner and children raised in violent households are more likely to experience a wide array of physical and mental health conditions,” said Terry.

Verizon is a national leader in the education and prevention of domestic violence. Today, the company joined the event to encourage more businesses to get involved in the prevention of domestic violence.

“Raising awareness of domestic violence and aiding in its prevention is a priority issue for Verizon,” said David Russell, Verizon Vice President of External Affairs. “Verizon is proud to partner with the Texas Council on Family and lend our voice to raise awareness about the health implications of domestic violence to a wider audience in an effort to save lives.”

The Texas Council on Family Violence has been advocating for victims of domestic violence for 35 years.  As one of the largest domestic violence coalitions in the nation, we lead efforts to end family violence at the statewide level.  Our partners include domestic violence shelters across the state.

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