Archive for February, 2014

Published by rrios on 17 Feb 2014

Executive Directors from Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Programs from Around the State Gather in Austin for Joint Conference

Austin, Texas – The Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (TAASA) and The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV) Executive Directors from domestic violence shelters and rape crisis centers in Texas gather to discuss emerging issues in serving survivors and challenging societal misconceptions about both topics.   

Sexual assault and domestic violence issues received welcomed attention recently with the City of Dallas’ Mayor Mike Rawlings hosting of “A Rally against Domestic Violence” and President Obama’s announcement of the “White House task force to protect students from sexual assault.”  Executive Directors are unique in their responsibility to effectively serve victims while working to prevent the occurrences of abuse altogether. 

This year’s Conference will be held at the Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort and Spa on February 18 and 19, 2014.  Executive directors are expected to have a large set of skills to help their agencies thrive.  Fundraising, board relationships, staff management and program development are pressing issues leaders will discuss. 

“Bringing together leaders who shape their respective communities response to the complex needs of victims is essential.  They not only learn from key presenters on relevant topics, they also learn from one another.  These practices keep us focused on providing the safety, empowerment, tools and resources that best serve families in crisis,” says Gloria A. Terry, CEO of TCFV. 

Victims of sexual and domestic do not differentiate sexual assault services from those carved for family violence.  What they do seek are sensitive and knowledgeable advocates, resources, and assistance to take the first successful steps towards becoming survivors. 

As programs continue to expand our vision for leaders in Texas working with these vulnerable populations, they determined that a true and genuine partnership between coalitions provides the greatest opportunities for success.  TCFV and TAASA work jointly to maximize efforts for developing impeccable services across the state for lives disrupted by violence.

 “This conference gives the leadership of sexual assault and domestic violence agencies across the state an opportunity to enhance their skill sets on myriad issues impacting non-profits.  It’s more important today than ever to foster strong, efficient, and well-managed organizations that both serve victims and positively impact their respective communities,” says Annette Burrhus-Clay, Executive Director of TAASA. 

TAASA and TCFV hope that by joining forces they can unite the strong voices of the violence against women movement in Texas and provide vital resources to our members.

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The Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (TAASA) is the statewide organization committed to ending sexual violence in Texas. A non-profit educational and advocacy organization based in Austin, TAASA member agencies comprise a statewide network of more than 80 crisis centers that serve rural as well as metropolitan areas. Founded in 1982, the agency has a strong record of success in community education, legal services, youth outreach, law enforcement training, legislative advocacy, and curricula and materials development.  Additional information about TAASA can be found at www.taasa.org.                                      

The Texas Council on Family Violence (TCFV), formed in 1978, is one of the largest domestic violence coalitions in the nation.  TCFV promotes safe and healthy relationships by supporting service providers, facilitating strategic prevention efforts, and creating opportunities for freedom from domestic violence. For more information visit www.tcfv.org.

Rose Luna – Communications Program Director – TAASA – 512-659-8065

Angela Hale – 512.289.2995, angela@redmediagroup.com

Published by rrios on 13 Feb 2014

TCFV Kicks Off New Campaign Called “Young Hearts Matter” to Raise Awareness During Teen Dating Abuse Awareness Month in February

Teens Spread the Word Across Schools in Texas During National Dating Abuse Awareness & Prevention Month

Austin, TX (February 1, 2014) – Today Young Hearts Matter, a new campaign to bring awareness to teen dating abuse, launched in Texas to raise awareness during Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month.  Teen dating abuse happens in every school across Texas and the United States.  Dating abuse takes place when a person physically, sexually, verbally or emotionally abuses another person in the context of a dating or romantic relationship and when one or both of them is a minor.

This month, students in schools across Texas with the help of domestic violence service providers, school districts and TCFV are getting involved in campaigns in their schools to help identify the signs of an unhealthy relationship and help students know their dating rights.

In today’s environment, technology like social media and texting, can make it east for teens and young adults communicate, but it can also make it easy for a dating partner to use technology to harass, control and abuse their boyfriend or girlfriend.  The Texas Council on Family Violence is working to make sure students are engaged, educated and empowered to know their rights and know when they are involved in healthy dating relationships.

“The hearts of the young people in our lives are precious.  Teen dating violence is an urgent and silent problem across Texas,” said Texas Council CEO Gloria Terry.  “We are getting our sons and daughters involved in raising awareness at an early age in hopes that they will never experience or perpetuate violence.  We are thrilled to be working with local programs and student leaders across Texas who are coming up with many innovative ways to educate their peers in their schools.  The Texas Council on Family Violence has created “Young Hearts Matter” which comprise posters and other materials that can be used in schools across Texas to help students know their rights when they are in a relationship.”

Teen Dating Violence looks many ways, but can involve: put-downs, extreme demands on time, intimidation, isolation, constant texting, stalking, and physical injury.  Teen Dating Abuse can also involve forced sex, forced pregnancy, threats of violence, suicide, stalking and murder.

Statistics in a statewide survey show that 75% of 16 to 24 year old Texans have either personally experienced dating violence or know someone who has experienced it.   According to a recent study, between 42% and 87% of dating violence occurs in a school building or on school grounds, with the highest occurrences in rural areas.

Schools in Texas can help teens lay the foundation for making good dating decisions while they are in school by applying a whole-school approach to end the violence happening on school grounds, making their dating abuse policies clear and implementing them, training faculty and staff to recognize and respond to the signs, educating youth to support behavioral change and by observing Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month every February.

Published by rrios on 13 Feb 2014

TCFV Kicks Off Campaign Called “Young Hearts Matter”

TCFV recognizes The Corpus Christi School District & the Prevention & Education Program of Women’s Shelter of South Texas 

Corpus Christi, TX (February 13, 2014) – Today, a day before Valentine’s Day, the Texas Council on Family Violence is launching Young Hearts Matter, a campaign to bring awareness to teen dating abuse. February is National Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month.  Teen dating abuse happens in every school across Texas and the United States.

Events and programs to raise awareness allow students to come forward and get advice and help before a situation escalates to violent behavior.   In today’s environment, technology like social media and texting, can make it easy for teens and young adults communicate, but it can also make it easy for a dating partner to use technology to harass, control and abuse their boyfriend or girlfriend.  The Texas Council on Family Violence is working to make sure students are engaged, educated and empowered to know their rights and know when they are involved in healthy and unhealthy dating relationships.

TCFV is recognizing outstanding efforts to educate students about teen dating violence. Today, TCFV thanked The Women’s Shelter of South Texas for leading the way in creating a successful Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month curriculum.

Educators from the Women’s Shelter of South Texas conduct an eight- week curriculum with teens called “Moving Up-Stream.”  Each session focuses on a topic such as: addressing and defining social norms, exploring the concept of gender, positive and negatives of music, aggressive, passive and assertive communication, defining sexual harassment, exploring power differences and individual responsibility, defining consent, and exploring bystander behavior.

“The Women’s Shelter of South Texas is pleased to partner with the Texas Council on Family Violence and the communities we serve to recognize February as Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month and the importance of prevention,” said Frances Wilson, President and CEO of the Women’s Shelter of South Texas.  “Prevention is a means to the literal end of the attitudes that support violence against women.  Prevention represents the hope for our future and for the generations to come.”

This month, students in schools across Texas with the help of domestic violence service providers, school districts and TCFV are getting involved in campaigns in their schools to help identify the signs of an unhealthy relationship and help students know their dating rights.  Dating abuse takes place when a person physically, sexually, verbally or emotionally abuses another person in the context of a dating or romantic relationship and when one or both of them is a minor.

“The hearts of the young people in our lives are precious.  Teen dating violence is an urgent and silent problem across Texas,” said TCFV CEO Gloria Terry.  “We are getting our sons and daughters involved in raising awareness at an early age in hopes that they will never experience or perpetuate violence.  We are thrilled to be working with local programs, school districts and student leaders across Texas who are coming up with many innovative ways to educate their peers in their schools.  The Texas Council on Family Violence is also thrilled to recognize Frances Wilson, President and CEO of the Women’s Shelter of South Texas, and her entire team for their outstanding work raising awareness in the Corpus Christi School District.”

Teen Dating Violence looks many ways, but can involve: put-downs, extreme demands on time, intimidation, isolation, constant texting, stalking, and physical injury.  Teen Dating Abuse can also involve forced sex, forced pregnancy, threats of violence, suicide, stalking and murder.

Statistics in a statewide survey show that 75% of 16 to 24 year old Texans have either personally experienced dating violence or know someone who has experienced it.   According to a recent study, between 42% and 87% of dating violence occurs in a school building or on school grounds, with the highest occurrences in rural areas.

Schools in Texas can help teens lay the foundation for making good dating decisions while they are in school by applying a whole-school approach to end the violence happening on school grounds, making their dating abuse policies clear and implementing them, training faculty and staff to recognize and respond to the signs, educating youth to support behavioral change and by observing Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month every February. Click on link to download Young Hearts Matter materials.

For more resources check out this page:

http://www.tcfv.org/prevention-resources